Museum of the Month: Durham Museum

While it is not devoted solely to transportation, the Durham Museum in Omaha, Nebraska, is located in Omaha's recently restored Union Station. The station's areas for ticketing, dining, and passenger waiting have been restored, along with the original station soda fountain. Several historical train and transit cars are open for viewing and walk throughs on …

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The Story Behind of the Spirit of St. Louis

The Missouri History Museum recently posted a blog about Charles Lindbergh and his 1927 flight from New York to Paris 91 years ago this month. The blog's text was adapted from Daniel L. Rust's book, "The Aerial Crossroads of America: St. Louis's Lambert Airport." http://mohistory.org/blog/the-story-behind-the-spirit-of-st-louis/ -Thanks to Daniel Rust for this post.

60th Anniversary of the San Francisco “Freeway Revolt”

January 2019 is the 60th anniversary of the so-called “Freeway Revolt” in San Francisco, when the Board of Supervisors voted to rescind authority for seven of nine planned freeways within the city limits. The historic importance of the San Francisco event was that, for the first time, a local government rejected an entire plan of freeways …

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New Paper: Railroads of the Raj

A recently published paper ("Railroads of the Raj," American Economic Review, April 2018) looks at the history and development of the Indian railroad system. The paper is also a recent example of the academic "long time to fruition" publication process -- I think it was a job market paper for Dave Donaldson in 2008 and …

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Video of the Month: Going to Town (1985)

The Skytrain is Vancouver's automated mid-capacity transit system. It now consists of 53 stations along 80 km of lines. This documentary is on the first line built for Expo86. Going to Town is a 30 minute 1985 documentary by JEM Productions for B.C. Transit, capturing the genesis of the SkyTrain project and its construction. Featuring …

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Museum of the Month: National Museum of the American Indian

The National Museum of the American Indian has an excellent exhibit on The Great Inka Road. Construction of the Inka Road stands as one of the monumental engineering achievements in history. A network more than 20,000 miles long, crossing mountains and tropical lowlands, rivers and deserts, the Great Inka Road linked Cusco, the administrative capital …

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New Paper: Route Change on Freeways

Joe Weber, "Route change on the American freeway system," Journal of Transport Geography 67 (February 2018), pp. 12-23. Abstract The first elements of the American freeway system were built in the 1920s and now comprise over 59,000 miles of roads. In addition to growth in the system at both the national and urban levels and increases in …

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View from the Canals (London, 2017)

Essay by Dhan Zunino Singh from T2M March 2018 Newsletter "Walking has become desirable as much as fashionable in the context of sustainable mobility policies and mobility studies, respectively. But walking can be pleasant, stressful, or dangerous according to when, how, where, with whom. In the last years, I have become involved in cycling activism, but …

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John Scholes Prize 2018 – Journal of Transport History

Description from T2M March 2018 Newsletter: "The John Scholes Prize is awarded annually to the writer of a publishable paper based on original research into any aspect of the history of transport and mobility. The prize is intended to recognise budding transport historians. It may be awarded to the writer of one outstanding article, or …

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